Monthly Archives: February 2013

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The Modern Bitch is a small but noteable blog run by a young English woman based in Hong Kong. Her posts vary quite widely, with women in mind. I tweeted this link out, but I think it’s good to have some insight here for our younger audiences as well.

 

TMB says:

 

This can be one of the most stressful and confusing decisions to make because everyone’s different. If you’re one of those people who have always known that a career in medicine or law was the path you wanted to take (and you have a passion for it), then great, you’re sorted!

For those of you who have never thought about what you want to do or where you want to be until it’s come to choosing classes in school, or having the careers talk, or have even ended up in an industry that you don’t enjoy working in, then don’t worry, TMB might be able to help in a small way! This can also apply to those of you who may want to study an evening course while working full-time, or even choose a different career path completely (it’s not against the law to do that).

Read the rest here.

 

Please discuss your thoughts with us:

@wmnasiapacific

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

LinkedIn group

 

@modernbitchblog

 

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We don’t usually promote other people’s events on WMN, because we take care and precision over how we curate our calendar for the year. But there’s one debate which is really worth the attention and AmCham HK are running a breakfast event before our next, which should nicely inform and ripen our ideas before the day.

In our Careers Blog (members only access) I recently posted some background and interview with Anne Marie Slaughter, who says that we can’t have it all and that women are not supported to have a career and children, while continuing to support and raise their children throughout their childhoods.

The AmCham event is titled Male Female Differences at Work:

 

The ‘fit’ between gender and the different stages in an organisation’s ‘lifecycle’ will be used to illustrate that it’s very unlikely that the same individual will be successful leading an organisation throughout its entire ‘life’.

 

 

The implications of this research for corporate careers and corporate success will be presented, as well as some development implications.

 

 

 

 

 

On March 26th, we will host our next eventDeconstructing the myth – having it all.

 

In celebration of International Women’s Day, WMN HK are having a very special event. To those of you who went to last year’s exciting CASBAA event it will be a similar format and in the same fabulous Bloomberg auditorium.The panel discussion will feature WMN’s founder (and mother of two and the COO of The Red Flag Group) Bobbi Campbell, as well as guest speakers. It will be moderated by Mia Saini, a reporter for Bloomberg.

 

All too often we hear the words  ”you can have it all”, particularly when we see high-powered women, such as Marissa Mayer (CEO of Yahoo) claiming success in juggling both work and family. Is it true – can we really have it all, or are we really kidding ourselves? This controversial issue will be the focus of the panel’s discussions.

 

Please join us for our debate and share your ideas and thoughts with us before hand, on our social media platforms (#wmndecon)

 

@wmnasiapacific

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

LinkedIn group

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A topic which is always close to our hearts at WMN is ‘Can women have it all?’.

It’s a topic that has been high in debate of late, from looking at how Marissa Mayer’s career and move to Yahoo! and then announcing she was pregnant, to our events surrounding disruption and of course, the discourse created by Anne Marie Slaughter in the US. (Check that link, there are reams of articles that are relevant to you).

Our Hong Kong Chapter President, Christina Pantin is someone who’s very intrigued and dedicated to this debate, she regularly shares articles that she’s read about the debate and looking at how we can use this to advise and inspire our WMN members.

AmCham HK is hosting an event in March, around this issue. To warm us up, here’s an extract of an interview with Anne Marie Slaughter, with some background to the discussion.

Anne-Marie Slaughter on women, work and Washington

by Shelley DuBois, writer-reporter November 7, 2012

 

The Princeton professor and former State Department official discusses her take on leadership and work-life balance.

 

FORTUNE — In what felt like a knockdown, drag out election season, we heard plenty about the problems in Washington and improving the lives of American women. As a foreign policy professor and a woman who has worked in Washington, Anne-Marie Slaughter knows these issues all too well.

 

Slaughter currently teaches at Princeton, but last year, she ended a two-year term as the director of policy planning for the U.S. State Department. She was previously dean of Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

 

Slaughter also, suddenly, reignited the perennial debate among working women this past summer after she wrote an article in The Atlantic called “Why Women Still Can’t Have it All.” She spoke with Fortune about leadership in Washington and why women should not blame themselves if they are struggling to balance work and family.

 

An edited transcript is below.

 

Fortune: You’ve been a dean and you’ve worked in the State Department. How do you lead differently in academia versus in the government?

 

Anne-Marie Slaughter: Well, my one-liner is that in academia, you’re rewarded for coming up with a really big idea that has only your name on it, but in Washington, you’re rewarded for cutting big ideas into little ideas and getting other people to think they thought of them. It’s an old adage in Washington that you can get anything done if you don’t want to take credit for it, and it is true.

 

But the real difference is Washington is the politics. I don’t know if the politics are fiercer but they’re different. I had to watch my back a lot more.

 

People were out to get you?

 

They certainly are very happy to cut you out. It’s just the way the town tends to work. It’s not a place that rewards team collaboration very often.

 

But I had to send very different signals, and I did. I would actually tell my people, “look, success is not having defended our turf, success is having gotten our ideas adopted.”

 

Were you rewarded for achieving your definition of success?

 

There are a number of projects that I am just enormously proud of having been part of, but my fingerprints are often not on them. It’s just the way it has to be. You know and your team knows, and inside, the Secretary will give you credit if she can, but by and large, it’s about a larger goal.

 

So how do you convince yourself to do major projects when your name isn’t on the work?

 

That is where I think being an academic really helped. I knew at some point I was coming back here. I have an outside life and an outside identity that many people inside don’t have.

 

I also made a choice early on that I wanted to be able to look back and have achieved one big thing. So I volunteered for this Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review which was a real bear because it had never been done before it involves putting state and aid agencies together and it was a huge process headache and a lot of people didn’t want to get anywhere near it.

 

Did that work? Does it hold up?

 

Yeah, it does. In fact, I often get students who say they want to get a job with some initiative or office that the QDDR was part of and I feel just enormously proud. I feel like, “yeah we did that, and it’s going to have a real impact.”

 

How should people think about leadership if they truly want to work across agencies and cultures, like you did for that project?

 

I would say it’s the difference between being at the top of the ladder or the center of the web. Power is whom you bring together and how you bring them together and what you enable. You are still exercising power, but it is a much more empowering kind of power.

 

And how, if at all, has your role as a female leader change after you wrote the article in the Atlantic?

 

Ah. Well, it certainly added an agenda to a life that was pretty full. Hanna Rosin has said I’m the woman who left the State Department to spend more time with my children and then I wrote an article about it, so it means I’ll never see my children again. I did not, of course, expect it to take over my life.

 

But I felt a sense of responsibility that is just part of being a teacher, a mentor, a mother — just somebody who looks after other people. And people tell me every single day how much they’ve talked about it, what a difference it made.

 

When I read it, I just thought, “thank God I’m not crazy.”

 

That’s one of the things that makes it worth it for me — so many women were out there thinking it was their fault. Many have had to make compromises they didn’t expect to make and they feel like failures and they’re not failures, it’s the system.

 

We have not enabled people to have children and be with those children and still stay on the career track in ways that allow them to rise over the course of a lifetime.

 

Somewhere along the line, we got to a place where saying, “I’m choosing not to accept the promotion because I want to spend more time with my children” is regarded as some kind of weakness or unprofessionalism, and that’s very bad for society as a whole.

 

When I sort of ripped it open, everybody was like, “Whoa, I’m not alone.”

 

 


 

AmCham HK is hosting Male-Female Differences at Work on March 12th at 8am which we think will be an interesting debate in the lead up to our next event on March 26th, Deconstructing the having it all myth (#wmndeconstructing)

The ‘fit’ between gender and the different stages in an organisation’s ‘lifecycle’ will be used to illustrate that it’s very unlikely that the same individual will be successful leading an organisation throughout its entire ‘life’.

The implications of this research for corporate careers and corporate success will be presented, as well as some development implications.
All attendees will be encouraged to complete a questionnaire beforehand to compare results with Selby & Mills research findings at the event.
Dr. Colin Selby is a Chartered Occupational Psychologist with a PhD in Business Management. He has extensive consulting experience in Europe, America, Africa and Asia. He has taught at Manchester University, London Business School and the Open University. He has been an executive member of the Division of Occupational Psychology of the British Psychological Society with special responsibility for public & international relations for the profession. Dr. Selby is responsible for Client service and relations, product development and consulting. In 2010 he was shortlisted for Occupational Psychologist of the year in the UK.

 

 

As ever, we’d love to hear your thoughts and experiences on this topic. Please contact us if you’d like to write a blog, or join the conversations on social media:

@wmnasiapacific

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

LinkedIn Group 

 

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Our first event of the year was an exciting and fun one – which if you’re not morning person (I’m not), is just what you need. And I should mention, our kind hosts California Vintage did a great job with the menu (California breakfast muffin, yes please). Moreover, the topics and advice syncronised nicely with everything else that’s been going on in my life lately, both at home and at work.
The task for the event was Developing mindfulness, reliance and confidence, learning strategies and techniques to transform challenges and setback into opportunities.
Our speaker, Sally Dellow from Rock the Boat had promised a frenetic event with audience participation, which is what we got with our small but comfortable crowd.
“Are you dealing with VUCA? ” Asks Sally.
VUCA is Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, Ambiguity. The term was coined in the 90s for those dealing with the military issues. It’s likely that you’ve felt this at work or home recently. We live in a VUCA world, which isn’t going to change, so we have to manage our reactions.
We’re asked to put down our bags and phones (as if that isn’t scary enough?) and shut our eyes. This is a grounding exercise, so we tune out everything but place our feet on the footrests and consider that we are planted on the stool and the stool is on the ground. We bring the energy up from the ground and into our bodies. Sally asks us to feel connected and say: “I am grounded. I am open”. This is a good way to check yourself in the busy world; it will help give you resilience.
Ever seen anyone shake when they’re giving a speech? In our daily lives, our fight or flight response will blind us. But then when we need it, adrenalin kicks in. Yet constant adrenalin is bad for us too. This is Sally’s killer cocktail – adrenalin and cortisol, those stress hormones, which will literally give you a heart attack.
With a chart provided by Sally, we look at the world around us.
Meet SCARF
Status, Certainty, Autonomy, Relatedness, Fairness.
Engagement and motivation will make us move toward a person, job or situation. But bad feelings will give a fight or flight response, where of course, flight takes over (see image at bottom).
Another slide shows that 65% of us are disengaged, un-energised – or worse – through our work. You might not think it, but those feelings and sentiments lead to feelings of stress (it’s not just complacency). High stress gives a 23% increased risk of a heart attack.
Meanwhile, a survey in Hong Kong shows that 74% of white-collar respondents experienced short attention span, memory loss and difficulty processing tasks. Our brains need a rest too.
There’s more than one reason why we need to give ourselves a break and put ourselves first. Ever flown on an airplane? The answer is yes, I’m sure. Think about how we’re told on flights to place our own oxygen masks before helping others. It’s for a reason. We need to breath healthy oxygen and have clear minds in order to think in order to act – in order to be of help to others. It’s an analogy also used in twelve step groups to show that it is ok to put yourself first; it is not necessarily selfish.
We naturally think it’s bad to put ourselves first, but it’s not. So here’s another exercise. Think of two situations where you need extreme self-care. It could be having a lie-in on Saturday. It could be making a delicious meal. Commit to yourself that you will do it in the next seven days. Write it down. Go on!
And when you’re getting stressed, remember to take a moment to come back down to earth. Because you need to be resilient.
Resilience will help you
  • Bounce back from adversity
  • Overcome the stress of threatening circumstances
  • Adapt successfully to challenges
Resilience is actually genetic – some of us really are more resilient than others, according to Sally. Those who are more resilient tend to be highly committed to the things in our lives. The more threads we have that connect us to our world – friends, family, hobbies, work, societies etc the less we will be rocked when one of those threads breaks. Our zone of control is less highly shaken.
When everything goes wrong, we can control our bodies, thinking and even our feelings.
Sally shares tips for feeling in control:
Permanence: To have a positive and resilient mindset, see negative events as temporary.
Pervasiveness: If one thing is going badly, focus on where things are going well and remember that you are the same person across those situations.
Fully acknowledge the things you can and cannot control.
And finally, forget the three pillars of happiness – some people don’t feel happy but there is something that can be more important.
The five pillars of wellbeing (PERMA)
  1. Positive emotion
  2. Engagement
  3. Relationships
  4. Meaning
  5. Achievement
In this exercise (PDF attached at the bottom), take two coloured pens and mark your score in those areas (each ring is 25% with the lowest percentile in the centre. Make a mark in the correct ring for you, under that category). Do one colour for you and another colour for work in order to see where you’re at.
How perfect is your circle? Now think about how to move towards where you want to be.
What went well
Here’s an exercise to do every night. When something scores low, think about what your wish would be to change it. Doing this will help you to get your ideas and sense of gratitude in order. While this exercise seems simple, let it become a practice and it will really help. It will become part of your natural approach to looking at things in your life; it breeds positivity.
Respond don’t react
Don’t let your emotions take control of your behaviour. If you’re afraid, it’s because you think you’re facing a saber tooth tiger. But you always control your breathing and your body, so take control and loose the fight or flight response. Breath, smile, deflect and decide.
(You don’t need to be unemotional – process your emotions).
Mindfulness exercises are plentiful
Shut your eyes and practice your smile without interruption.
Hormones can also help:
  • Connect with people and it releases Oxytocin along with sentiments of trust, loyalty and openness.
  • Laugh, serotonin gives perspective and stops you from muffling your words.
  • Be mindful, it lowers the stress hormone of Cortisol. Slow down, don’t get bowled along by life.
  • Exercise gives endorphins, which gives women a bigger hit than men. Just move around and feel more euphoric.
Well after an hour of inspiration, it’s time to STOP.
  • Sit
  • Take a breath
  • Observe
  • Prioritise

There’s a great list of short, tweeted takeaways here:
Please share and repost this blog and follow us
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When I first read this article, I thought it was going to be about pitching to new clients – to win business. It’s not really, to me it’s more useful as an internal tool but perhaps I’d always consider not making the client look stupid before I open my mouth.

That said, the piece might still be useful to some of you, especially those accused of lacking tact or those who are just starting out in their careers.

Thanks to iMedia Connection for their useful blogs.

 

 

Digital marketers spend a lot of time pitching new ideas — to their clients, to their bosses, to their own teams. And that’s a good thing. New ideas are what make this industry such an interesting place to be.

 

 

That said, for an industry that revolves around the art of the pitch, some of us are quite bad at it. We say inappropriate things. We stick our feet in our mouths. We back ourselves into corners. We put other people in the room on the defensive.

 

 

Whether you’re trying to sell a client on an innovative marketing concept or introducing a new idea to your internal team, the words you use are vital. And saying the wrong thing at the wrong time can shut down a roomful of open minds in an instant.

 

 

If you’re trying to sell your great idea, don’t let these words come out of your mouth.

 

Read the rest here.

 

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As some of you know, our first event of the year is coming up – and it’s part of the breakfast series so I really hope that California Vintage, our kind hosts, have good coffee. I’m a coffee snob.

But let’s not digress. I was hoping to find and share all kinds of interesting blogs around our topic for Wednesday, but with CNY and other things, I haven’t read anything that came my way, which fit. And I didn’t have time to search things out.

So here’s a note from me.

What I’m excited about for this event is that it follows on nicely from our last event at CASBAA. While Emma Reynolds, Mia Saini, Mariko Sanchanta and Joanne Ooi did a great job at disrupting our lunch hours, our ideas and getting us in the mood for changing things up, this event will be a great way of extending those sentiments.

 

Sally Dellow from Rock the Boat plans to share strategies and techniques to transform challenges and setbacks into opportunities. Well, ‘rock the boat’ already implies a bit of disruption, so I hope she’s ready to wake us all up.
During my degree, I faced a setback when a proposal for an exhibition was refused due to good old British Health & Safety. I was upset and taken aback – I was a first year student. My tutor told me to turn it around and create something in reaction to that. All I wanted to do was hide inside and eat biscuits and drink tea. It was winter. Somehow, I managed to combine my first idea, my tutor’s comments and my desire to hibernate into one, tiny art piece, which made the biggest statement to the powers that be. That was my first lesson in disruption.
Since then, I’m always looking for ways to do things differently and better – not bigger, better, faster, stronger, but with a better outcome for all those involved. As the Director of my creative services agency, I always have to consider setbacks and challenges. I have to warn my clients about them. While I admit to being able to do that, I’m less often required to turn something bad into something good, so Wednesday morning will be a real treat for me because I think that’s one area where I fall short. I get stressed, before being able to think things out.
Sally has promised lots of audience participation, which judging by our last event, will go down really well.
I’m looking forward to seeing you all there.

As a pre-event teaser, Rock the Boat have asked “think about which animal type you are and how this impacts on your reaction to adversity, so you can learn how to control and adapt your reactions.”

Wednesday 20 Feb, 2013
8:00am – Registration and networking; 8:30am – Talk begins

9:30am – Wrap

California Vintage
Shop 110, Brim 28
28 Harbour Road
Wan Chai

Cost: Free for members, $100 for non-members. Breakfast available to purchase.

To sign up, please click here.

 

Twitter
The event hashtag will be #wmntransform.
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I read this post last week and it was so interesting – and relevant – that I had to share it with you.

For one of my clients, I manage a PR account. The client is entirely ROI focused, which makes it really difficult to work with social media. There’s no easy way for us to claim online (alone) as a strong portal for them to get coverage because they only see the ad value in print and they measure their social platform purely in terms of Likes. While that is a way of working, it’s not at all accurate.

The other thing that this article helps with, is figuring out how to market to those different kinds of people who Like your page.

Thanks to iMedia connection for curating interesting topics.

 

As I started researching this article, I found quite a number of articles about the different types of Facebook friends and fans. They use a lot of cute names for the types of friends and fans (my favorite being “the poker player” — thank goodness Facebook’s poke functionality is pretty much ignored now), but very few articles address the brand impact that different types of fans can have.

 

When you talk to many marketers, they predominantly talk about their brands’ Facebook fans as “brand advocates.” This implies that every Facebook fan a brand has is out there telling everyone how great the brand is and bringing other followers into the brand’s sphere. Last year, I talked about the myth of brand advocates, so we won’t rehash that in great detail here. Instead, we’ll focus on the various types of fans that comprise most brands’ Facebook audiences and the different ways in which brands should treat these groups.

 

Read the rest here.

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Our first event of the year is coming up as one of the WMN Breakfast series.

 

With the Year of the Black Snake associated with intelligence, power and ambition, we are pleased to have Sally Dellow from Rock the Boat. She will share winning strategies and techniques to transform challenges and setbacks into opportunities for the year ahead and has promised an exciting event with lots of audience participation.
The event will provide the opportunity to meet like-minded media professionals from a range of backgrounds and sectors, and to gain helpful insights into cultivating valuable personal development and leadership strategies.

Wednesday 20 Feb, 2013
8:00am – Registration and networking; 8:30am – Talk begins

9:30am – Wrap

California Vintage
Shop 110, Brim 28
28 Harbour Road
Wan Chai

Cost: Free for members, $100 for non-members. Breakfast available to purchase.

To sign up, please click here.

 

Twitter
The event hashtag will be #wmntransform.
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