Monthly Archives: April 2013

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Dare, Dream, Do: ways to begin living the life you always dreamed of

Would you like to lead a life that feels more authentic and true to your dreams? Are you ready to move beyond the trapping of goals that matter to others but not to you? Would you like to know how to feel more inspired and do the best work of your life? If yes, you are ready for the “Dare, Dream, Do” webinar.

 

Women Media Networks invites you to join the conversation with two inspiring and fabulous women - Whitney Johnson and Dr. Tanvi Gautam - who will share stories, practical tools and wisdom to help you reconnect with your dreams and live a more authentic and inspired life. The webinar builds on the wisdom from Whitney Johnson’s book by the same name and from Dr. Tanvi Gautam’s international workshops on women and the inner work of leadership.

Dr Tanvi Gautum also shares some inspiration for us, in advance of the event – and she advises to search around these pages well for extra inspiration!

Podcast #1 features Johnson and Gautum:

http://wowfactor.asia/podcast-with-whitney-johnson/

 

 

Podcast #2 features Johnson and Gautum talking more personally about their thousand dreams:

http://wowfactor.asia/a-conversation-to-launch-a-thousand-dreams/

 

To sign up for the event, click here.

 

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The event at California Vintage on April 17th, 2013 was lead by Jay Oatway.
Social Media has become very important over the past 10 years and has so much power behind it today, that it even drives certain brands and businesses. Despite being around for such a long time, not everyone knows how to use it and a few people admitted to this during the event.
Social Media doesn’t have to be complicated; it’s merely people being social in a digital space. Jay Oatway (@jayoatway) explains the different platforms available – and that it’s vital to use them in order to create an online presence for your brand. It can be confusing to figure out which is best for you, but don’t let it discourage you from at least trying some out and exploring each platform.
Twitter
Twitter has wide and diverse users who will talk about anything and everything… even their breakfast. This platform uses updates from users in the form of  a Tweets – and when posting you’re restricted to 140 characters. Don’t be discouraged by that, as Oatway explains that people use hashtags (like #wmnsocial101) to monitor conversations.
Popular hashtags trend, so sometimes you’ll see real time news before the news broadcasters have even written about it. I have found tweeting to be very beneficial to TMB, helping me to build up like-minded followers and tweet useful links that are relevant to the topics on my blog.
As social media is all about presence for brands, Oatway advises people to customise their profiles. Use a real picture of yourself as a profile picture. It can put potential followers off if your tweets and profile look like a hard brand and not a human tweeting behind that brand.
Once you’ve got the profile sorted, then what do you tweet? Social media is about sharing stories, so don’t be afraid to interact and share yours. You can search for your interests on Twitter and then interact with those who have the same interest, by asking questions or adding value to questions other people have tweeted. Oatway explains that not enough people listen, so it’s best to listen first and then add value. Another big no-no on Twitter is to shout about your products or service non stop – so be careful.
Facebook
Did you now that George Takei is one of the most influential people on Facebook? I mention this because it can be useful to look at what other people are doing and seeing how they’re interacting with people, then implement it to suit your brand. Facebook is great because you can create your own page and schedule when to post at a relevant time, by using the clock icon. This is ideal if you’re a very busy person (I use this a lot, because I don’t always have time to post things when I want).
When using Facebook for business or personal purposes, Oatway stresses that it’s important to always have a positive attitude when sharing. Keep it positive and try to ignore people who attempt to get a bad reaction from you. Heated debates can arise from controversial news or personal opinions. In those situations, other users can try to evoke negativity. Since social media is a space where people can put across their personal opinions, whether it’s on your blog or your brand page, always deal with negative comments in a positive way.
LinkedIn
LinkedIn is seen as more of a serious platform where people tend to discuss business and your profile reflects your resume. This may be the case, but Oatway says don’t be afraid to use LinkedIn for networking or creating groups with common topics as it’s not just a job hunting platform. You can still find groups based on your personal interests, but be careful if the group if of a slightly controversial topic because if you’re connected to work colleagues, they can see your groups on your profile.
If you are going to use your brand as a group, or create a group that shares interests on LinkedIn, then you need to continuously post and invite others, or it won’t thrive or grow.
Oatway compares social media to gardening where profiles and groups will only grow if they’re maintained daily with posts and responses to comments. This is something I can relate to, as it’s a problem that I face on a regular basis when finding interesting links to share on my platforms.A scheduling app, such as Hootsuite or Buffer will usually solve this problem, letting you line up posts and connect all your platforms to the app. Not only that, but there’s prime posting times and Oatway mentions this briefly. It’s good to post during those times so more people see your content.
Google+
This is a platform that I’m still figuring out for myself, but I know it’s really important for search engine rankings (SEO) because, well, it’s Google. According to Oatway, this is an up and coming social network, so it’s good to get on there while it’s becoming increasingly used. What’s interesting about G+ is that it uses circles, instead of friends, followers or connections. You can build circles according to who they are and what they do, so you can have circles with successful women, circles with friends, circles with family… the list goes on. You can also share these circles, so it’s good for businesses.
Google+ is similar to Facebook in that you can create pages for your brand. It’s very visual with a large section for cover photos, but what differentiates G+ from Facebook is that you can create communities on G+. Communities are similar to groups in LinkedIn, so you can have a space where other users can have their input. It’s important to provide a space for users to do this as Oatway emphasises that listening in social media is vital in helping you know what followers and customers like and don’t like. When you know your audience, you can make changes to better your website, business or platform.
Quick Tips
  • Be consistent with all your profiles – ensure they all have the same logo
  • Listen more than you talk – learn from people’s advice or opinions
  • Share positivity – ignore the negativity and rise above the trolls
  • Grow the communities you want – find interests and like-minded users
Towards the end of the event, Oatway offers advice on digital marketing strategies and advises to use advertising and sponsored stories within Facebook. As it’s a very popular platform, users Like a lot of pages. You will have to compete with others in regard to how you show up on a user’s news feed (Edgeranking) and paid advertising helps you stay in people’s feeds for longer. He said it’s also good to gain more Facebook Likes on your page, so you have more people to advertise to.
If you’re completely new to social media, then it’s probably a good idea to choose 1 or 2 platforms and then slowly build them up. Follow other influential users and people/ groups who post content you’re interested in, then wait for the right moment to add value to discussions. If you’re looking to create multiple accounts on different platforms for your brand, then it’s a good idea to look into an app to assist with posting, such as Tweetdeck or Hootsuite.
At the end of the day, everyone has an opinion on social media and which platforms they prefer. Everyone uses it differently too. I actually don’t know much about LinkedIn and Google+ as they’re not my preferred platforms but since the event I have considered using them more. Social media is always growing and networking sites are always evolving, adding new features and changing layouts. It comes with many advantages, including feedback for your brand, so join in the conversation, share your stories and create a buzz.
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Next Wednesday (April 17th) is our next event, and one that I requested. That’s right my friends in media, a social media 101.

Why? Well since I started at WMN as the community manager, I found that while we have a lot of points to cover in our events, we have much less chatter online. But aren’t we all working in media? Don’t we know how to use these modern modes of communication? Aren’t we all tech savvy?

I’m hoping, in part, to find out the answer to that during the session. While it’s easy to think that those in the media industry might be on top of such modern phenomena, there’s no reason to assume so. In fact, often those higher up in their departments are often behind on these things, because they simply don’t have time to find out how, or, forget their password from the one hour during which, with gusto, they had decided to learn something new.

Jay Oatway will lead us in our session, in which I have asked him to literally teach us how to post and how to tweet. That shouldn’t take long, so we hope for an interactive session with some useful dos and donts as well as general brand advice for those also representing a brand online, as well as themselves.

I did notice that during our last session we saw a few more tweeters online. Perhaps it was because we were at Bloomberg – and afforded the luxury of two screens showing our event hashtag and the flow of Twitter conversations going on. I definitely picked up a few followers from the event then as well. So I hope that after this, we’ll have even more of our WMN members online, chatting and tweeting away with us.

Please join us for our debate and share your ideas and thoughts with us before hand, on our social media platforms (#wmnsocial101)

@wmnasiapacific

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

LinkedIn group

 

To sign up for the event, click here.

 

 


 

JayOatway, JayOatway.com

Jay has more than 100,000 social media followers worldwide and has been dubbed “Hong Kong’s answer to Twitter royalty” by Marketing magazine. He is also a co-founder of the popular MeetUp group #HKSocial andSocial Media Week Hong Kong.

Bring: your social tool of choice and your questions.

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PRESS RELEASE from TEDx Happy Valley (interview opportunities)

 

Dr Elaine Dundon – Shares with Hong Kong how to turn rejection into a positive event.

 

“Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for.”

 

So wrote Viktor Frankl, late Holocaust survivor, author of bestselling book, Man’s Search for Meaning, and the inspiration for Radical Resilience Week which will take place in Hong Kong, April 7-13, 2013.

 

Kicking off on Sunday, April 7 in conjunction with World Health Day, Radical Resilience Week is a series of community events designed to inspire, inform and motivate all who participate.

 

The organisers of TedxHappyValley are incredibly excited to announce that Dr Elaine Dundon will be a contributing speaker, and will be talking about facing rejection positively and with resilience. She’ll be sharing her wisdom and expertise on Innovation Management and finding meaning in life and work, throughout the week at the RRWHK events.

 

 

 

Elaine spent 13 years in the corporate world before founding The Innovation Group, a Global consulting firm based in the US which has advised hundreds of leaders and organisations on innovation strategy over the last 16 years.

 

Her bestselling book, ‘Seeds of Innovation’, sets out the nine step process by which companies can truly embrace innovation and explains that to find meaning and success, innovation needs to cover all aspects of a business. Critically, organisations need to learn how to be resilient, how to bounce back from external and internal set backs, to be prepared and ready to withstand the challenges that come their way. This is even more vital as company structures become ever more complex, supply chains more global and the economic situation more  challenging. When you consider that all this is set against the backdrop of a world where natural disasters, war, and political unrest are prevalent, it becomes clear what a vital tool resilience is in the modern world.

 

 

The skills companies need to embrace are as valid for individuals when facing the

challenges that are thrown at them. The hot topic in schools and at government level in many countries, is how to better incorporate basic skills of resilience into education, in order to better prepare children to face their challenges positively and to ensure we are developing robust and successful leaders of the future.

 

Understanding how pivotal personal resilience is, Elaine has focused on the “Human Side of Innovation” and specifically meaning, which she believes is the key focus for determining success in both life and work. When one has meaning, they have purpose and are more equipped to face life’s challenges head on and with resilience. Wishing to share these beliefs with others, Elaine co-founded The Opa! Way in 2010. She and her co founder, Dr Alex Pattakos have written a forthcoming book entitled The Opa! Way and are leading the Meaning Movement.

 

Elaine’s talk ‘It’s time to reject rejection’ will focus on how rejection challenges the powers of resilience and how in reframing events, and looking at them more positively, you better equip yourself for life.

 

INTERVIEWS FOR THE PRESS

Dr Dundon will be available for interviews on Monday 8th April at Ovolo and will be talking at the below times:

 

Tuesday 9th April 8-10am HKFC about her work at the Radical Resilience Active

 

Communications Speaker Showcase

Wednesday 10th April 7.30-9.30pm about Anthrocapitalism at Biscous as part of Green Drinks

 

For more information, to organise an interview or to attend any of the above events, please

contact bess@bonzapie.com
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I came across Women Media Networks when doing research for my own site, The Modern Bitch, in August 2012. At that point I thought it would be a dream to be part of WMN and eight months later I was given the opportunity to attend an event in celebration of International Women’s Day.
One thing that inspired me to create a site for young women in Hong Kong was a TED Talk by Tavi Gevinson, a teen blogger who discussed feminism and how she was still figuring things out. Feminism has always been something close to my heart and since I was a child, I’ve always looked up to women and had female role models whether it be lead singers in bands or successful women in the corporate world.
In the UK, where I grew up, teen pregnancy is high and many of my friends weren’t aiming high or thinking about their future. When I entered my early teens I started to become very ambitious and knew that a career was something I wanted and family would come later. By the time I graduated and an opportunity came along in the form of Hong Kong, I knew it was a calling and I had to push past my worries and fears. Two years on I have a stable job that I enjoy and continue to think about my future in terms of career first and family later.
The discussion started straight at the root, as the panel asked each other if women could really have it all? I personally believe that women can, but not everything will be in balance all the time. It also depends on the definition of  ’having it all’ as this differs for everyone. Most of the room agreed.
My version of having it all from a basic definition would be having a successful career while having a family at the same time. One thing I took away is that the definition is difficult to simplify because all kinds of complexities come into family and career such as, whether you have your own business – and how big it is – how big your family is, whether you’re a single parent… the list goes on.
Bobbi Campbell touched on the point that you have to be really good at what you do in order to have the right to tell people you’re leaving at 5.30pm and will be unavailable for certain hours. I completely agree. It involves years of hard work and staying late to work your way up to the top, which in turn makes you really good at what you do. This isn’t always easy for women who aren’t necessarily at the top and after doing a little research on Marissa Mayer and Yahoo!, it’s clear that having understandable employers who support your choice of working and raising a family is something that is vital in having balance.
Doubt is one of the biggest problems that I face while trying to succeed in work and managing my side projects. It was a relief when Mia Saini mentioned this and an even bigger relief when other women agreed. Confidence is something that I have struggled with from time to time and I had a lot of doubts when creating my website, especially over the name. I overcame this by using my instincts and asking myself, what’s the worst that can happen?
It was great to hear advice from Bobbi regarding checking a company’s culture before working there and she stressed the importance of being comfortable asking co-workers for help. It was reassuring to learn that some women have key influencers to aspire to, which helps them overcome the fear of asking.
Letting go of some control over your work and allowing others to step in was also a big talking point and Chris Bowers mentioned having to allow her staff to handle things for her after having twins. I thought about this and considered it a challenge in the future for me personally as I like to be in control of every little detail and think that other ambitious women might feel the same way. Bowers also mentioned that she met with personal development coaches to better herself in order to better her business. That is definitely something to take on board. Other people help you grow.
Towards the end of the discussion, Shea Stanley and others panel members talked about the future and what can be done now, to help change the stereotypical view of mothers. It’s important to educate children on equality and leading by example by sharing chores between the parents, so the mother isn’t doing it all and they don’t see just mum doing it all. There is also some advice for younger women in that they shouldn’t worry about the future or planning family. Just focus on pursuing something you love and figure out how family will fit in later on. Not only that, but do not doubt yourself. Just own it!
One of the main things that I can relate to and take away from the discussion is that women are still trying to figure it out. None of the women in the room that day had all the answers or a 101 on how to have a career and family at the same time. What I felt inspired by is that strong and successful women have come together to discuss this. I may have a long way to go in building a career for myself, but I learnt a lot during that discussion and I think it’s very important to expose younger women to these discussions to ensure the lives and roles of women continue to progress healthily.

Read more from Beth’s blog, The Modern Bitch.
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