Monthly Archives: June 2013

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The #wmngoals session on Wednesday June 19th, 2013 was centred around aligning personal and work goals – understanding and creating your personal brand so that your life flows cohesively and brings you satisfaction.

 

The commercial introduction to our speakers from Linkage Asia seemed to take a while, but more fool us – Vivian Lo and Yulee Teng were actually trying to demonstrate the use of personal brands. What does Teng mean to Lo?

A CV might not tell you so much about a person after all – did you mention that you’re a qualified yoga teacher, which shows another area of commitment and perseverance to achieve?

To start the session, we look at Want, Should and Can.

Want refers to your energy – that’s a bit more like who you are, what motivates you, what you care about.

Should relates to your role – what’s expected of you by others, be it family or work.

Can is about your abilities and productivity – what you’re able to do, what your skills are.

Believe it or not, these elements do need to be in some balance. The joke is that doing what you shouldn’t want is called sin. But really, how do you feel when you don’t do what you want to do? Feel tired, despondent, frustrated and so on.

Aligning Want, Should and Can creates a more effective person, utilising not just what they are good at but what they enjoy. So it’s always good to clarify ‘is this really what I want?’

When it comes to women, things are slightly different. The Should factor might be more family focused and of course, society comes into play. What does society expect? What is your culture?

Their view on female leadership is the choice – and commitment – to be a leader. Perhaps it’s more conscious than it is for men, due to other expected roles that women play. As you add more roles, you become busier trying to do it all – the mother, the host, the daughter, the wife, the business women, the social entertainer. So then, think about what you want and what you can do differently to equally juggle you Want, Should, Can. As you go along, you have to keep thinking about it.

 

How do you figure out what you want?

What are your motives? What deep-seated characteristics do you have that indicate who you are and what you find satisfying and enjoyable? Another thought is ‘if I won the lottery, would I still want to do what I do?’.

Everyone is driven by different things – some people love achievement but don’t care for the recognition. Others thrive on harmonious and supportive relationships. Some need to be able to influence others while some prefer to be powerful. Which are you? And then how do those translate to the work place?

Teng notes that women often dislike the word ‘power’ and see things differently, like influence as a positive, being used to create change. Whereas for a man, power seems like a positive  or accepted trait. In fact, there’s a difference between personalised and social power. Do you want to make yourself look strong, or make others feel strong? Again, you have to think about what drives you.

Think clearly about what you want and how that fits with your responsibilities. Sometimes you have to manage the want.

 

Your stakeholders include your clients, husband, peers, community and so on. Considering that, you can also define goals and objectives that you can achieve. Consider your parameters and then acquire the skills you need to achieve. But there’s more – how you communicate matters too. Do you fill the room or take a seat? Do you do both? Do you know where to sit in a room? Think about your personal presence.

So, chart your personal action plan – and perhaps, pick one thing you’ll do differently.

 

 

 

If you have thoughts, questions or readings to share in advance of the event, please talk to us via our social media accounts!

@wmnasiapacific (the hashtag for this event is #wmngoals).

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

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Our next event in Hong Kong, on June 19th, is about your personal brand.

 

This one sparks my interest more than ever, because after setting up my own creative servicescompany, I not only moulded a company around my skills but I became the personal brand through which I was trying to meet clients and earn a salary. Funny how that happens, without you really planning it that way.

For our breakfast event, the objective is to empower women to make career choices that are aligned with their life goals. Making work align with my overall life goals? Wow, that also sounds great. I almost feel a burst of “I can do that?!” even though this is something I’ve been slowly (realising and) doing for the past three years.

 

Our speakers, from Linkage, Vivian Lo and Yulee Teng will share some practical tools for participants to realise and own their goals in order to lead effectively in all aspects of life.

  1. Framework of the 3 Factors of Personal and Leadership Effectiveness
  2. Understanding your values and Defining Your Goals
  3. Women’s Life Cycle and Career Choices:  Making and Owning Your Choice

“What is your personal brand?” asks Yulee Teng. “Knowing what you wish to stand for and how you demonstrate that effectively in pursuit of a happy and successful personal and professional life, is what Personal Brand Management is all about.”

Teng will take us on a guided journey of understanding our own values and needs to be effective in roles that we play in our lives and career. Acknowledging that success may take a different form and definition over the life span of a woman, we’ll explore how tomaintain authenticity while leading ourselves and those around us.

 

 

 

 

But to get you thinking about things before the event, here are some of the things I do, when I’m trying to get my work (therefore, my life) to move in the direction I really want it to.

 

Make a list. It helps you to know what you want. Always have a few things you’re asking for in your life. If you don’t how will you get it?

Think about why. Why do you want that thing? Where will it lead you? What do you need to do to get into position to enable that thing to happen?

Talk to people. Tell them what you want, let it be general knowledge. And listen to what they say. Take note of the overall response you receive, just in case you are crazy… or missing something really important in your idea.

 

Those few things at least, will get you in the right frame of mind for our session. From the point of view of a small business owner, who is basically touting herself in the name of aforementioned business, I’m really looking forward to seeing what skills I’ll learn.

See you there,

Vickie

 

If you have thoughts, questions or readings to share in advance of the event, please talk to us via our social media accounts!

@wmnasiapacific (the hashtag for this event is #wmngoals).

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

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That there are not enough women working in higher up and management roles is a topic that keeps coming up – while in Hong Kong, we know from various studies how shockingly few women there are in the workforce, especially after child-bearing age, this is an issue all around.

This post, found on iMedia Connection, covers some important points and notes that this issue (notably in ad tech – and let’s face it, all tech industries including engineering) is not just a Hong Kong or Asia issue.

 


 

 

There is a clear gender imbalance in ad tech, especially at the senior level. Here’s how women can begin to flourish in the industry.

As an exciting, challenging, and constantly evolving sector, the ad tech industry has changed the way online advertising operates, attracting the brightest minds and spawning a wealth of innovative businesses. The result is an industry in which everyone wants to work. Yet despite all this dynamism, there is a distinct lack of women in the industry, especially at the senior level.

 

 

THE ROOT OF THE PROBLEM

This issue actually starts well before the workplace even factors in. Although test scores and grades show that women are strong in mathematics and science throughout grade school and high school, when it comes to degree courses, women are significantly under-represented in engineering and computer science. According to a 2011 report from the U.S. Department of Commerce, fewer than 14 percent of computer science degrees are earned by women. This means the lack of females is much more than just an industry issue. The challenge lies in attracting more women to college engineering departments.

While this challenge won’t be solved overnight, the lack of female engineers and computer scientists has a direct impact on the ad tech industry. Because the majority of companies in this space began as innovative, small technology startups driven by engineers, there is a male-specific bias at the senior level that has been inherent in this sector from the start. Furthermore, the additional time demands and commitment levels associated with working for a startup are often greater than those of a more established business, which could also impact the willingness of women with families to join the industry. Finally, the fact that many of these startups are funded by venture capitalists or angel investors — another male-dominated sector — further perpetuates the issue, as most board members and advisors tend to be men.

TRICKS OF THE TRADE FROM WOMEN IN THE FIELD

While it might seem like the odds are stacked against women in ad tech, it’s important to realize that working in this industry and being a good wife and mother are not mutually exclusive. Women should not have to choose one or the other. This false assumption deprives the industry of very talented individuals, especially when women feel they cannot return after maternity leave because the demands of the company don’t support them when their priorities have shifted to support a healthier work-life balance.

For women who are concerned about not being able to dedicate enough hours to the job, they must understand that when it comes to the working day, less can actually mean more. It’s not possible to equate hours spent at work with output, so if someone is in the office for 12 hours per day, it does not mean they are more effective than someone who is there for seven. What matters is how you control and use this time. It’s important to realize that you are in control of your calendar and success. Rather than leaving your calendar open, use it to book time for key activities such as researching, brainstorming, and keeping up-to-date with the industry — even booking days to leave early in order to spend time with the family — and then stick to your plan (within reason of course). Although it might mean less time in the office than male colleagues, it can also lead to an increase in productivity. Focusing on priorities can make people far more efficient with their time in the office.

For women who do reach a senior level, you must ensure that the key skills you bring to the business are not suppressed, as the response to operating in a male-dominated environment is often to “de-feminize” in an attempt to fit in and be “one of the guys.” Our advice is to reject this premise, realize it’s unnecessary, and understand that it’s a pressure you put on yourself, not something your male co-workers are forcing on you. Have the confidence to accept that you’re different from your male colleagues, and remain true to yourself by using your own skills to add value to the business. This is especially important in a leadership role where authenticity is critical. You must mean what you say and say what you mean in order to gain trust and respect from your team, partners, and clients.

One trick we’ve learned from our male colleagues is to be sure the right people know about our career aspirations. Men are more forthright about articulating their successes and stating exactly where they want their careers to lead. Women can often be more passive, and if you don’t communicate to your boss what you want from your career, he or she might assume you do not want increased responsibilities and the additional pressures they bring. As a result, you could be overlooked for career advancement opportunities, even if you are the most qualified person for the role. Speak up from the start, and make sure people clearly know what you want from your career.

As well as being more vocal, when it comes to technology, you can never be too inquisitive. This is critical to anyone’s success. Overcome any fears you have and “dive into the technology.” Sit down with the experts and don’t be afraid to ask questions. Push people to explain things in a way that you can understand and ingest. The more deeply you can understand things, the more valuable you can be to your company.

A LOOK AHEAD: THE FUTURE IS BRIGHT FOR WOMEN

Having more women in senior leadership roles will help address the lack of women in the industry for a number of reasons. First, they can become role models and mentors for other females as they overcome the obstacles traditionally associated with balancing home and work lives successfully. Women in senior roles can relate to the challenges facing other women who are entering the ad tech industry. At the same time, when it to comes to building effective and functioning teams, female bosses are less likely to consider the potential family aspirations of a female employee and will focus instead on what that person can add to the team and whether she is the right person for the job.

Over time, the ad tech industry will change for the better, and this will happen faster if we can incorporate more women in positions of true leadership and influence. It’s important for companies to encourage women to fully understand and maximize their potential while also developing a culture that supports a work-life balance. Women bring different skills and strengths than men, which can make organizations more holistic and resilient. Companies suffer when they lose valuable, skilled employees, as often happens when, for example, women choose not to return to this industry after they have children, or they stop looking for leadership opportunities because they feel discouraged.

We all passionately believe the ad tech industry offers a dynamic environment that can create enormous opportunities for women to imagine, create, and lead, and we cannot see ourselves working anywhere else. We must all work together to ensure we can attract and nurture more women in the industry who feel the same.

Denise Colella is president at Maxifier.

Nicolle Pangis, president at Real Media Group, and Maureen Little, senior vice president of business development at Turn, contributed to this article.

 


 

This article was originally posted here.

 

 

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