Tag Archives: Goals

For our event, Secrets of Their Success: Women in Media Tell Their Career Stories, we invited three panelists: Anne Wong, Director of Strategic Marketing at SCMP; Desiree Au, Publisher of Time Out Hong Kong and journalist and Ellana Lee, Managing Editor at CNN International Asia Pacific. Co-hosted with the FCC, Tara Joseph (FCC President – their first female pres) moderated. For more information on them, please view our previous blog here.

The hashtag for the event is #wmnstories.

The event is exciting for us, from the minute we walks in. “It’s a sexy crowd”, comments Au and another audience member says that since women love to hear about other women, the turn-out should be good. But for us, it’s the whole set-up – it’s almost like a wedding, with name place cards and refreshments laid out before we even arrive.

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Another pleasant surprise comes in the form of a group of Journalism students, who the FCC have allowed in for free. It’s great to see the cohesiveness of this, and I’m interested to hear their feedback afterwards. I hope one of the will write a blog of their experiences at the event. Afterwards, they interview HK Chapter President, Christina Pantin.

As the panel introduce themselves, Wong seems charming and confident. Au is funny and says she probably didn’t even deserve her first job in editorial – she’s modest. Lee says she suffered perpetual jetlag for three years after landing in Hong Kong because she landed on a Saturday and had to be at work by 1am, Sunday. But she knows how to motivate her team – who she likes managing – which is perhaps less usual for most journalists (managing things other than deadlines, I mean). She believes in investing in her team, which makes her sound like the perfect boss.

 

So, what makes work exciting for these ladies?

Wong: “News is a 24 hour business, it could be ideas or news, but the most exciting part of the day is when something new comes up.”

Lee: “Success is 99% good luck and 1% hard work – and I believe in that.” She tells a story of her first days at CNN when she had to ask an interviewee to explain some jargon. The interviewee was so annoyed that someone from CNN didn’t know this, that she hung up. It taught Lee that she always needs to do her homework and that the name CNN was probably why the interviewee had taken her call in the first place. There was a sense of responsibility.

“You will find mentors who will support you and help you get from A to B,” she says. At CNN she’s found her superiours around the region are supportive and willing to give advice. “Be willing to give more than just your job spec,” she says. Advice comes as an added service.

Au: “Life is about someone giving you a chance, like an interview and so on.” Au believes that the generosity of others has helped her, so that should be paid forward.

Wong adds that you should think beyond your job but think about the business and go further than just what your boss told you to do. For her, hard work is about 70% of success. “Chemistry is also important in your work place. Can your boss envision the ideas you have? Is your timing and environment right?” If not, she says you can’t push it further than that. Know when to tell yourself ‘it’s not happening, so move on’.

 

What are their experiences of being a woman in the workplace?

Lee: “My mother worked, in Korea, in the 80s. That was unusual. So my mindset is not really about being a women or a man, just walk in to the room, not thinking you have some deficit.”

Au: “In Hong Kong, I don’t feel like it matters so much if you’re a man or woman – if you break a story, you break a story.” She also thinks that we’re all equal, so when she hears women say “I have family commitments” well, men do too. Au also believes in assimilating. Despite working in an English language publication, Au speaks Chinese at work because her team is predominantly native speakers – and we are in Hong Kong – she feels that expats can likewise assimilate.

Wong: “Media is fairly even – it’s a case of making what you can of it. Various well-known companies do have women in top-level roles here”.

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Is journalism a dying career? Especially with social media, isn’t everyone a thought leader?

Lee encourages students to still go into journalism, because digital won’t end it. It might change the game, but it can be a part of reporting and of course, those platforms aren’t verified. People still want the truth. “It’s healthy for us to have the digital industry, it helps us reach people in far away places and it keeps us on our toes. Verify,” she adds. For the facts, people will still turn to the main, trustable news sources.

Au says that news is personal taste and we know who we want to hear our news from and that having these options helps people to be more interested and involved. People get to know what they want and look for that source. As someone who grew up in the UK, I prefer the BBC for everything, even Wimbledon commentary.

Wong adds that choice is making it better because the audiences know what they want.

Another question brings up quotas because the BBC had said that women should equal 50% of those dispatched to report.

Lee isn’t a fan but has never had to employ or dispatch journalists that way. Au also thinks it’s a dangerous game to play. “How can you put a system in place in an industry that changes every day? It’s about chemistry, not quotas.”

Wong relates to marketing and says “the idea that women and men should be 50-50 is perhaps more of a PR stunt than anything else.” But quotas can be good, she says. “The Women’s Foundation has a 30% quota for boards. If it changes the norm, then it’s not a bad thing.”

 

Is there a difference for women and men in journalism and are women too emotional?

Wong says “well, giving birth is emotional but we handle it quite well!” She adds that there are differences in genders which will change the chemistry and the story. “Women probably have a different emotional approach and reaction to men – a different EQ,” she adds.

Au thinks that men just have a different approach and are more results driven. But Lee, has never really thought about this before and says that empathy is important and perhaps women listen longer to find out what’s behind an interviewees feelings, behaviour and performance. “But in editorial discussions, everything counts. Your age also affects what you are thinking about or care about in your life, so that will be brought to the table when you do your job,” she explains.

 

What do you have to do to be everything you can be?

Wong: “Have faith in yourself and in others and in your future.”

Au: “Hard work and humility”

Lee: “The art of hiring is important. It’s instinctive and gut-driven. I have to think how that person will fit into our environment because every little detail counts so I need everyone in the team to do a good job,” she says, adding, “it’s important also to know you made a mistake and how to amend it.”

 

 

If you have thoughts, questions or readings to share in advance of the event, please talk to us via our social media accounts.

@wmnasiapacific

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

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The #wmngoals session on Wednesday June 19th, 2013 was centred around aligning personal and work goals – understanding and creating your personal brand so that your life flows cohesively and brings you satisfaction.

 

The commercial introduction to our speakers from Linkage Asia seemed to take a while, but more fool us – Vivian Lo and Yulee Teng were actually trying to demonstrate the use of personal brands. What does Teng mean to Lo?

A CV might not tell you so much about a person after all – did you mention that you’re a qualified yoga teacher, which shows another area of commitment and perseverance to achieve?

To start the session, we look at Want, Should and Can.

Want refers to your energy – that’s a bit more like who you are, what motivates you, what you care about.

Should relates to your role – what’s expected of you by others, be it family or work.

Can is about your abilities and productivity – what you’re able to do, what your skills are.

Believe it or not, these elements do need to be in some balance. The joke is that doing what you shouldn’t want is called sin. But really, how do you feel when you don’t do what you want to do? Feel tired, despondent, frustrated and so on.

Aligning Want, Should and Can creates a more effective person, utilising not just what they are good at but what they enjoy. So it’s always good to clarify ‘is this really what I want?’

When it comes to women, things are slightly different. The Should factor might be more family focused and of course, society comes into play. What does society expect? What is your culture?

Their view on female leadership is the choice – and commitment – to be a leader. Perhaps it’s more conscious than it is for men, due to other expected roles that women play. As you add more roles, you become busier trying to do it all – the mother, the host, the daughter, the wife, the business women, the social entertainer. So then, think about what you want and what you can do differently to equally juggle you Want, Should, Can. As you go along, you have to keep thinking about it.

 

How do you figure out what you want?

What are your motives? What deep-seated characteristics do you have that indicate who you are and what you find satisfying and enjoyable? Another thought is ‘if I won the lottery, would I still want to do what I do?’.

Everyone is driven by different things – some people love achievement but don’t care for the recognition. Others thrive on harmonious and supportive relationships. Some need to be able to influence others while some prefer to be powerful. Which are you? And then how do those translate to the work place?

Teng notes that women often dislike the word ‘power’ and see things differently, like influence as a positive, being used to create change. Whereas for a man, power seems like a positive  or accepted trait. In fact, there’s a difference between personalised and social power. Do you want to make yourself look strong, or make others feel strong? Again, you have to think about what drives you.

Think clearly about what you want and how that fits with your responsibilities. Sometimes you have to manage the want.

 

Your stakeholders include your clients, husband, peers, community and so on. Considering that, you can also define goals and objectives that you can achieve. Consider your parameters and then acquire the skills you need to achieve. But there’s more – how you communicate matters too. Do you fill the room or take a seat? Do you do both? Do you know where to sit in a room? Think about your personal presence.

So, chart your personal action plan – and perhaps, pick one thing you’ll do differently.

 

 

 

If you have thoughts, questions or readings to share in advance of the event, please talk to us via our social media accounts!

@wmnasiapacific (the hashtag for this event is #wmngoals).

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

LinkedIn group

 

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Our next event in Hong Kong, on June 19th, is about your personal brand.

 

This one sparks my interest more than ever, because after setting up my own creative servicescompany, I not only moulded a company around my skills but I became the personal brand through which I was trying to meet clients and earn a salary. Funny how that happens, without you really planning it that way.

For our breakfast event, the objective is to empower women to make career choices that are aligned with their life goals. Making work align with my overall life goals? Wow, that also sounds great. I almost feel a burst of “I can do that?!” even though this is something I’ve been slowly (realising and) doing for the past three years.

 

Our speakers, from Linkage, Vivian Lo and Yulee Teng will share some practical tools for participants to realise and own their goals in order to lead effectively in all aspects of life.

  1. Framework of the 3 Factors of Personal and Leadership Effectiveness
  2. Understanding your values and Defining Your Goals
  3. Women’s Life Cycle and Career Choices:  Making and Owning Your Choice

“What is your personal brand?” asks Yulee Teng. “Knowing what you wish to stand for and how you demonstrate that effectively in pursuit of a happy and successful personal and professional life, is what Personal Brand Management is all about.”

Teng will take us on a guided journey of understanding our own values and needs to be effective in roles that we play in our lives and career. Acknowledging that success may take a different form and definition over the life span of a woman, we’ll explore how tomaintain authenticity while leading ourselves and those around us.

 

 

 

 

But to get you thinking about things before the event, here are some of the things I do, when I’m trying to get my work (therefore, my life) to move in the direction I really want it to.

 

Make a list. It helps you to know what you want. Always have a few things you’re asking for in your life. If you don’t how will you get it?

Think about why. Why do you want that thing? Where will it lead you? What do you need to do to get into position to enable that thing to happen?

Talk to people. Tell them what you want, let it be general knowledge. And listen to what they say. Take note of the overall response you receive, just in case you are crazy… or missing something really important in your idea.

 

Those few things at least, will get you in the right frame of mind for our session. From the point of view of a small business owner, who is basically touting herself in the name of aforementioned business, I’m really looking forward to seeing what skills I’ll learn.

See you there,

Vickie

 

If you have thoughts, questions or readings to share in advance of the event, please talk to us via our social media accounts!

@wmnasiapacific (the hashtag for this event is #wmngoals).

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

LinkedIn group

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