Tag Archives: Social Media

Event hastag: #wmnkids

I know that this is an long write-up, but today’s fantastic event really deserves it!

It’s taken a lot of emails and turning over of ideas to get our CASBAA panel topic and guests just right. Recognising that we create the world in which we live, especially with such strong media influences, we will look at how today’s media affect our children – tomorrow’s leaders – how it shapes our thoughts, how children consume media and how they then see the world.


 

Our panel is made up of moderator and CNN International anchor/ correspondant, Kristie Lu Stout, with panel members: Christine Brendle, founding partner of Kids Dailies Limited and non-executive independent director of The Red Flag group; Jeremy Hall-Smith, Managing Director, Persuasive Networks Ltd; Jay Oatway, leading social media authority in Asia-Pacific; Alice Wilder, Educational Psychologist. 

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Lu-Stout opens the event admitting that as a youngster she watched it all, from Degrassi Junior High and Duck Tales to prime time shows like Golden Girls – totalling about five hours of media content a day. Now, we have more screens and different devices, on top of the web, apps and video games.

While second screen viewing is common, it’s something we didn’t experience as children. Wilder says that media kids can access as much media as they like. But she points out that kids don’t change – media does. “Their developmental needs and the impact media has on them doesn’t change, despite all these devices,” she says. Even from pre-school and early primary, children access things like YouTube and play with apps via their parents’ devices. What is the impact?

Defining ‘impact’, we look at language development. According to Brendle, from birth to five, parents push tablets and are proud at how fast children learn to use the right kind of technology, say for for language acquisition, especially when learning more than one language or how to write.

But after that age, parents want children to use pen and paper and take away access to the tablet. It’s a confusing message for children. “This needs reconciling. Our children’s minds will be different if they don’t learn to write the way we did, that’s part of how our brains develop, through tracing and copying.”

For Oatway, it’s about parental choices. Digital devices feel like unchartered waters when it comes to child rearing. “We’re weary of just plopping our kids in front of the TV and apps,” he says. There’s so much content now, accessible on so many devices that you have to co-view.

Lu points out that parents now curate what their children see, which was not such a factor in the past. Managing what your children watch or what app they use takes time to research and curate, Outway points out. But some apps and games are developed for learning and can be used well. Another point is that parents don’t often use parental locks, but typically the same device is used around the house, so kid can and will access programs used by adults too.

“What’s allowed into your house?” asks Wilder. It’s true, you wouldn’t have just any babysitter but the screen acts as one.

Do you converse with your child about what they have seen and what they feel about it? For instance, a program like Wilder’s Cha-Ching Money Smart Kids, which teaches financial literacy to 7-12 year olds, might encourage a child to talk about money with their parents, learning about something important.

But Wilder points out, conversations at school, even if your child didn’t see it, gives an experience of it. Hall-Smith re-iterates: Most parents don’t engage with their children over their TV viewing. “It’s more ‘I don’t have time at the moment,’ than a tool for discussion”. Perhaps in truth, we don’t approve of screen babysitting.

 

Kids online
Children going online is another media issue for parents. “In the past, it was the geeky kid who went online but now, all kids might do that, finding friends online who like what they like.” says Oatway, He says benefits include increasing self esteem. On top, the social currency is that you find things online that you talk about in the playground, making you cool and part of a group. It’s cool to be geeky.

Using Twitter in the classroom has also been positive according to Wilder. Young children learn about communication and if they tweet out, parents can see it and know what their child did that day, but also, children learn how to write messages and share their day.

Cyber bullying is a recent and heavy issue. Currently the story of three girls in Florida is all over the news. This unchartered territory is one that parents will have to watch this as their kids grow. But Oatway says “social media is open and transparent so cyber bullying isn’t secret – it’s not the back alley behind school, so why is this happening?”

If anything, social media should teach kids to be open and friendly but also learn how to build the right network of reliable friends and reach out if something bad happens. An issue that Oatway points out is that media is changing so fast that some children haven’t known to reach out and nor have adults been aware of the issues. Bad things have happened. Wilder reconfirms her belief that parents are responsible for discussing their kids activities with them: What have they been doing? Why? Perhaps again, the issue here, is lack of time.

Children’s digital footprint and privacy are another issue for Internet use. Online privacy classes might well be taught in schools eventually, alongside sex ed. “Being online and private depends on what network you use,” says Oatway. Twitter can be private, but Facebook is harder to manage in terms of managing privacy. But he advocates that Google + and Facebook encourage the use of real names, which leads for a more bona fide online friend. “The worst online trolls usually hide behind an anonymous mask. Here’s another conundrum: We want privacy but we also want transparency.”

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Copying what’s on screen – or do ratings matter?
In China a video of two boys were caught having tied a nine year old to a tree and set fire to him. They were copying a cartoon. But Hall-Smith points out that this is no different to the Three Stooges, it’s not new media.

Video games are something that parents and producers both consider when it comes to age appropriateness – and laws ensure that. But does that thought reach further? “There’s no longer a separate bubble of adult and child content,” says Brendle. Lu-Stout steps into the discussion with an anecdote: This conversation happens regularly at CNN International, who have recently introduced a “WARNING” alert on screen so that parents can stop their children from seeing inappropriate news content.

Rating systems or lack thereof matter – TV and apps are ungoverned, but broadcast is much more regulated than digital. Oatway says, “digital has a better chance of fixing this issue than broadcast will, because as people increasingly log into content via a social media account like Facebook, the channel or media source can identify the supposed age of that user. TV doesn’t have that luxury.”

Hall-Smith quips, “you’re pre-supposing that those running such platforms have an interest in verifying the age of the person behind the account. Children will subvert any controls they can. The genie is out of the bottle and always has been. Look at what they’d do to get GTA!”

Brendle reminds us again, “we need to consider what needs to be protected from the past, from traditional roles of education.” Her concern is less over morals but what brain activities, what stimuli we know works. Wilder adds that technology is just another tool, nothing else. Pre-schoolers are curious and are life-long learners, so as adults creating content we should capture that, and use technology to help. The invention of the printing press didn’t make everyone an author. The invention of the camera didn’t make everyone a director.

 

If you have thoughts, questions or readings to share, please talk to us via our social media accounts.

@wmnasiapacific

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

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Our next event in Hong Kong, on June 19th, is about your personal brand.

 

This one sparks my interest more than ever, because after setting up my own creative servicescompany, I not only moulded a company around my skills but I became the personal brand through which I was trying to meet clients and earn a salary. Funny how that happens, without you really planning it that way.

For our breakfast event, the objective is to empower women to make career choices that are aligned with their life goals. Making work align with my overall life goals? Wow, that also sounds great. I almost feel a burst of “I can do that?!” even though this is something I’ve been slowly (realising and) doing for the past three years.

 

Our speakers, from Linkage, Vivian Lo and Yulee Teng will share some practical tools for participants to realise and own their goals in order to lead effectively in all aspects of life.

  1. Framework of the 3 Factors of Personal and Leadership Effectiveness
  2. Understanding your values and Defining Your Goals
  3. Women’s Life Cycle and Career Choices:  Making and Owning Your Choice

“What is your personal brand?” asks Yulee Teng. “Knowing what you wish to stand for and how you demonstrate that effectively in pursuit of a happy and successful personal and professional life, is what Personal Brand Management is all about.”

Teng will take us on a guided journey of understanding our own values and needs to be effective in roles that we play in our lives and career. Acknowledging that success may take a different form and definition over the life span of a woman, we’ll explore how tomaintain authenticity while leading ourselves and those around us.

 

 

 

 

But to get you thinking about things before the event, here are some of the things I do, when I’m trying to get my work (therefore, my life) to move in the direction I really want it to.

 

Make a list. It helps you to know what you want. Always have a few things you’re asking for in your life. If you don’t how will you get it?

Think about why. Why do you want that thing? Where will it lead you? What do you need to do to get into position to enable that thing to happen?

Talk to people. Tell them what you want, let it be general knowledge. And listen to what they say. Take note of the overall response you receive, just in case you are crazy… or missing something really important in your idea.

 

Those few things at least, will get you in the right frame of mind for our session. From the point of view of a small business owner, who is basically touting herself in the name of aforementioned business, I’m really looking forward to seeing what skills I’ll learn.

See you there,

Vickie

 

If you have thoughts, questions or readings to share in advance of the event, please talk to us via our social media accounts!

@wmnasiapacific (the hashtag for this event is #wmngoals).

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

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The event at California Vintage on April 17th, 2013 was lead by Jay Oatway.
Social Media has become very important over the past 10 years and has so much power behind it today, that it even drives certain brands and businesses. Despite being around for such a long time, not everyone knows how to use it and a few people admitted to this during the event.
Social Media doesn’t have to be complicated; it’s merely people being social in a digital space. Jay Oatway (@jayoatway) explains the different platforms available – and that it’s vital to use them in order to create an online presence for your brand. It can be confusing to figure out which is best for you, but don’t let it discourage you from at least trying some out and exploring each platform.
Twitter
Twitter has wide and diverse users who will talk about anything and everything… even their breakfast. This platform uses updates from users in the form of  a Tweets – and when posting you’re restricted to 140 characters. Don’t be discouraged by that, as Oatway explains that people use hashtags (like #wmnsocial101) to monitor conversations.
Popular hashtags trend, so sometimes you’ll see real time news before the news broadcasters have even written about it. I have found tweeting to be very beneficial to TMB, helping me to build up like-minded followers and tweet useful links that are relevant to the topics on my blog.
As social media is all about presence for brands, Oatway advises people to customise their profiles. Use a real picture of yourself as a profile picture. It can put potential followers off if your tweets and profile look like a hard brand and not a human tweeting behind that brand.
Once you’ve got the profile sorted, then what do you tweet? Social media is about sharing stories, so don’t be afraid to interact and share yours. You can search for your interests on Twitter and then interact with those who have the same interest, by asking questions or adding value to questions other people have tweeted. Oatway explains that not enough people listen, so it’s best to listen first and then add value. Another big no-no on Twitter is to shout about your products or service non stop – so be careful.
Facebook
Did you now that George Takei is one of the most influential people on Facebook? I mention this because it can be useful to look at what other people are doing and seeing how they’re interacting with people, then implement it to suit your brand. Facebook is great because you can create your own page and schedule when to post at a relevant time, by using the clock icon. This is ideal if you’re a very busy person (I use this a lot, because I don’t always have time to post things when I want).
When using Facebook for business or personal purposes, Oatway stresses that it’s important to always have a positive attitude when sharing. Keep it positive and try to ignore people who attempt to get a bad reaction from you. Heated debates can arise from controversial news or personal opinions. In those situations, other users can try to evoke negativity. Since social media is a space where people can put across their personal opinions, whether it’s on your blog or your brand page, always deal with negative comments in a positive way.
LinkedIn
LinkedIn is seen as more of a serious platform where people tend to discuss business and your profile reflects your resume. This may be the case, but Oatway says don’t be afraid to use LinkedIn for networking or creating groups with common topics as it’s not just a job hunting platform. You can still find groups based on your personal interests, but be careful if the group if of a slightly controversial topic because if you’re connected to work colleagues, they can see your groups on your profile.
If you are going to use your brand as a group, or create a group that shares interests on LinkedIn, then you need to continuously post and invite others, or it won’t thrive or grow.
Oatway compares social media to gardening where profiles and groups will only grow if they’re maintained daily with posts and responses to comments. This is something I can relate to, as it’s a problem that I face on a regular basis when finding interesting links to share on my platforms.A scheduling app, such as Hootsuite or Buffer will usually solve this problem, letting you line up posts and connect all your platforms to the app. Not only that, but there’s prime posting times and Oatway mentions this briefly. It’s good to post during those times so more people see your content.
Google+
This is a platform that I’m still figuring out for myself, but I know it’s really important for search engine rankings (SEO) because, well, it’s Google. According to Oatway, this is an up and coming social network, so it’s good to get on there while it’s becoming increasingly used. What’s interesting about G+ is that it uses circles, instead of friends, followers or connections. You can build circles according to who they are and what they do, so you can have circles with successful women, circles with friends, circles with family… the list goes on. You can also share these circles, so it’s good for businesses.
Google+ is similar to Facebook in that you can create pages for your brand. It’s very visual with a large section for cover photos, but what differentiates G+ from Facebook is that you can create communities on G+. Communities are similar to groups in LinkedIn, so you can have a space where other users can have their input. It’s important to provide a space for users to do this as Oatway emphasises that listening in social media is vital in helping you know what followers and customers like and don’t like. When you know your audience, you can make changes to better your website, business or platform.
Quick Tips
  • Be consistent with all your profiles – ensure they all have the same logo
  • Listen more than you talk – learn from people’s advice or opinions
  • Share positivity – ignore the negativity and rise above the trolls
  • Grow the communities you want – find interests and like-minded users
Towards the end of the event, Oatway offers advice on digital marketing strategies and advises to use advertising and sponsored stories within Facebook. As it’s a very popular platform, users Like a lot of pages. You will have to compete with others in regard to how you show up on a user’s news feed (Edgeranking) and paid advertising helps you stay in people’s feeds for longer. He said it’s also good to gain more Facebook Likes on your page, so you have more people to advertise to.
If you’re completely new to social media, then it’s probably a good idea to choose 1 or 2 platforms and then slowly build them up. Follow other influential users and people/ groups who post content you’re interested in, then wait for the right moment to add value to discussions. If you’re looking to create multiple accounts on different platforms for your brand, then it’s a good idea to look into an app to assist with posting, such as Tweetdeck or Hootsuite.
At the end of the day, everyone has an opinion on social media and which platforms they prefer. Everyone uses it differently too. I actually don’t know much about LinkedIn and Google+ as they’re not my preferred platforms but since the event I have considered using them more. Social media is always growing and networking sites are always evolving, adding new features and changing layouts. It comes with many advantages, including feedback for your brand, so join in the conversation, share your stories and create a buzz.
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Next Wednesday (April 17th) is our next event, and one that I requested. That’s right my friends in media, a social media 101.

Why? Well since I started at WMN as the community manager, I found that while we have a lot of points to cover in our events, we have much less chatter online. But aren’t we all working in media? Don’t we know how to use these modern modes of communication? Aren’t we all tech savvy?

I’m hoping, in part, to find out the answer to that during the session. While it’s easy to think that those in the media industry might be on top of such modern phenomena, there’s no reason to assume so. In fact, often those higher up in their departments are often behind on these things, because they simply don’t have time to find out how, or, forget their password from the one hour during which, with gusto, they had decided to learn something new.

Jay Oatway will lead us in our session, in which I have asked him to literally teach us how to post and how to tweet. That shouldn’t take long, so we hope for an interactive session with some useful dos and donts as well as general brand advice for those also representing a brand online, as well as themselves.

I did notice that during our last session we saw a few more tweeters online. Perhaps it was because we were at Bloomberg – and afforded the luxury of two screens showing our event hashtag and the flow of Twitter conversations going on. I definitely picked up a few followers from the event then as well. So I hope that after this, we’ll have even more of our WMN members online, chatting and tweeting away with us.

Please join us for our debate and share your ideas and thoughts with us before hand, on our social media platforms (#wmnsocial101)

@wmnasiapacific

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

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To sign up for the event, click here.

 

 


 

JayOatway, JayOatway.com

Jay has more than 100,000 social media followers worldwide and has been dubbed “Hong Kong’s answer to Twitter royalty” by Marketing magazine. He is also a co-founder of the popular MeetUp group #HKSocial andSocial Media Week Hong Kong.

Bring: your social tool of choice and your questions.

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When I first read this article, I thought it was going to be about pitching to new clients – to win business. It’s not really, to me it’s more useful as an internal tool but perhaps I’d always consider not making the client look stupid before I open my mouth.

That said, the piece might still be useful to some of you, especially those accused of lacking tact or those who are just starting out in their careers.

Thanks to iMedia Connection for their useful blogs.

 

 

Digital marketers spend a lot of time pitching new ideas — to their clients, to their bosses, to their own teams. And that’s a good thing. New ideas are what make this industry such an interesting place to be.

 

 

That said, for an industry that revolves around the art of the pitch, some of us are quite bad at it. We say inappropriate things. We stick our feet in our mouths. We back ourselves into corners. We put other people in the room on the defensive.

 

 

Whether you’re trying to sell a client on an innovative marketing concept or introducing a new idea to your internal team, the words you use are vital. And saying the wrong thing at the wrong time can shut down a roomful of open minds in an instant.

 

 

If you’re trying to sell your great idea, don’t let these words come out of your mouth.

 

Read the rest here.

 

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I read this post last week and it was so interesting – and relevant – that I had to share it with you.

For one of my clients, I manage a PR account. The client is entirely ROI focused, which makes it really difficult to work with social media. There’s no easy way for us to claim online (alone) as a strong portal for them to get coverage because they only see the ad value in print and they measure their social platform purely in terms of Likes. While that is a way of working, it’s not at all accurate.

The other thing that this article helps with, is figuring out how to market to those different kinds of people who Like your page.

Thanks to iMedia connection for curating interesting topics.

 

As I started researching this article, I found quite a number of articles about the different types of Facebook friends and fans. They use a lot of cute names for the types of friends and fans (my favorite being “the poker player” — thank goodness Facebook’s poke functionality is pretty much ignored now), but very few articles address the brand impact that different types of fans can have.

 

When you talk to many marketers, they predominantly talk about their brands’ Facebook fans as “brand advocates.” This implies that every Facebook fan a brand has is out there telling everyone how great the brand is and bringing other followers into the brand’s sphere. Last year, I talked about the myth of brand advocates, so we won’t rehash that in great detail here. Instead, we’ll focus on the various types of fans that comprise most brands’ Facebook audiences and the different ways in which brands should treat these groups.

 

Read the rest here.

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Writing tips are always interesting – some even conrtadict others, though many are repeated, like write all the time, write every day, practice your trade.

 

But the most interesting are those from renowned, famous writers, especially those we know from the literary field.

Gifted writers such as Kurt Vonnegut and Anton Chekhov worked according to certain tenets of the craft. Here are some favorites.

Just because you’re writing blogs or website content doesn’t mean you can’t learn a few things from the great writers of yesteryear. In looking at the tips below, you might be surprised at how relevant and timely their advice can be.

Here are 10 ways to improve your writing, online or otherwise:

1. Write, write, write.

“Quantity produces quality. If you only write a few things, you’re doomed.” —Ray Bradbury

You know what they say, “If you want to be a writer, write!” What applies to novels and newspaper columns also applies to the Web: The more you practice, the better you become. Keep churning out content, refining as you go, learning what works and what doesn’t. Over time, your content will improve.

Read the rest here.



How the social media landscape will develop is a question that is always discussed during social media think tanks. Not only are we unsure of the future – and is it just a phase? – but we can also play a part in guiding it.

This post from Ragan.com gives six interesting prediction for social media in 2013. And some of them we’ve all heard before, so we should take note. A picture does tell a thousand words. Infographics are on the rise. And yes, timing is everything.

 

Although 2012 was filled with exciting PR and social media developments, including London’s 2012 Olympic extravaganza,Prince Harry’s Las Vegas scandal, and a down-to-the-wire race for the U.S. presidency, the coming year is sure to see even further transformations of the media landscape.

1. LinkedIn is the new Facebook. More brands will use LinkedIn to monitor conversations and connect with customers and influencers. New and enhanced features on the site, such as its “endorse” capability (which employs the one-click validation of a Facebook “like”) and new profile and company page designs are encouraging users to spend more time building their personal brands with LinkedIn’s tools. Companies, particularly in the B2B world, will increasingly recognize its marketing potential. Also, as adoption and activity on LinkedIn surge, journalists will spend more time using the platform for research, identifying sources and breaking stories.

Read the rest here.



Lots of people have social media accounts like LinkedIn and Facebook, but they don’t always know the right way to use each one. And they are different, so should be treated and approached differently. After all, who wants to give a potential employee access to their Facebook page? That’s what LinkedIn is for.

Here’s a re-post from Firebrand Blog with some tips for those using LinkedIn.

 

Almost everyone I’m in contact with through business is on LinkedIn these days (and if you’re not, you should be). It’s a brilliant, professional, online business networking site and a place where you’re expected to promote yourself through your own profile and other areas of the site. Having said that, I consistently hear people moaning about a number of things that their connections do that really annoys them.

Since my post on 18 things you should not do on Twitter was so well received, I thought I’d share my candid thoughts on what you should avoid on LinkedIn.

Read the rest here.



“What does disruption mean?” asks Janine Stein, at the panel of experienced change makers to start off the discussion.

Sue Adams, Head of Learning and Development at Aldersgate Partners and Bamboo Businesses, began the round by differentiating change and disruption. “Change occurs every day, whereas disruption is big transition.” As many women in the room could probably attest, Adams explained that having a baby or moving to a new job is a disruption – it’s not an everyday change.

Jennifer Berthold, Vice President and General Manager of American Express Singapore, said  “From a corporate point of view, unanticipated change is disruption – change that’s not asked for but happens to be change you have to respond to.”

Charmaine Huet said philosophically that what is permanent and what isn’t has been contemplated for centuries by thinkers such as Plato – disruption can be both big and small. Huet is the former Communications Director for Discovery Networks Asia-Pacific and described how leaving Discovery to take care of her baby, then becoming the General Manager at La Barca Ristorante was a disruption she initiated to create more balance in her life. “For big decisions in life, balance is key” she advised.

 

For Abi Sekimitsu, General Manager at Reuters South East Asia and Pacific, disruption is changing what we’ve always done. It’s about getting out of our comfort zone and often comes with the big question: Are we ready to challenge ourselves?

 

The panel gave a three-sixty perspective on how disruption presents itself, how it can be dealt with and harnessed to bring about positive change and improvements to get head, both in our lives and in the global market.

The common theme of the morning was that disruption was necessary for growth, especially in this time over ever evolving technologies, market behaviour and personal choices. Encouraging innovation (“embedding it into the DNA of a company”, as put by Jennifer), soliciting collective buy-in from all stakeholders and employees from the top-down and bottom-up and changing our perspective of failure are vital when embracing and deploying disruption. A good method to move towards this is to give incentives, understand the fear behind resistance and create a forum for discussions.

Both eastern and western approaches to failure were discussed among the panel. The concept ‘fail fast, fail quickly and move one’ was introduced. Adams offered a coaching perspective that ‘win, learn, Change’ is a more positive formula.

Review and acceptance should be part of every organisation – failure should be taken out of the equation. Bad decisions are not failure, Sekimitsu added, because it’s a step away from where we started; the only failure is not trying. From an eastern perspective, Sekimitsu and Huet noted that failure equates with shame. Asians need to learn to separate failure with shame so innovation can be adopted.

Guests at the event also heard that women make fantastic change managers. Women are natural communicators and collaborators. Good managers ask questions, they engage. It’s an ego-free process where what’s best for the organisation is conveyed and the best outcomes happen when everyone is one board.

 

 


 

About the author:

Amanda Blum is a freelance writer, traveller and social entrepreneur. She was born in raised in London and spent the latter part of teen and adult life growing up in a small town in Florida where she studied English Lit, Anthropology and Environmental Science.

 

In the spirit of change and innovation, Amanda recently migrated to Singapore in search of new challenges, projects and eco opportunities.

www.amandablum.com