Tag Archives: Social Networking

2014-05-22 20.18.06

Have you ever done an MBTI or Myers Brigg’s Type Indicator test to figure out your communication style? I haven’t. And by the sounds of it, that’s ok.

Last night we held a small Lumina workshop, which is a development from MBTI which works differently, assessing us as people that are changeable and wear different hats in different situations. We were there to learn more about communication styles and to learn how to read others.

2014-05-22 19.08.28

As some 22 people piled into the Thomson Reuter’s boardroom (thanks for the lend!), I was interested in seeing us huddle together with our colleagues and friends –  there were only two other WMN staff alongside me, with a majority of TR guests, followed by those from Turner.

Having already answered the questionnaire (so that Lumina could give us our profiles at the end of the session) I was aware of a few behavioural aspects: Do I take charge in a group? Do I like to bring others around to my point of view? Upon meeting Donna from Lumina, I quickly said that I was aware when answering, that my responses for work-based situations were different than those for family, friend or social interactions.

When it came time to sit and start the session, guess who was there saying “no, don’t sit on the side and it’s ok if you didn’t do your questionnaire, please sit in the middle so we have a nice audience”? Me, of course! Hey, I was there for work, I’m a WMN staff member. And I knew that we wouldn’t not be sitting still for too long. But I also noticed how in these situations, we do herd together.

The session, which took us through personality ‘areas’ (not types, because it can all be blurry), which you can see partially in the image below. It’s broken into:

Yellow – Social, imaginative, spontaneous

Green – Intimate, collaborative, empathetic

Blue – Observing, Evidence-based, Reliable

Red – Purposeful, Competitive, Takes charge

But note the blurring colours inbetween, too.

Lumina

And did you know that we make our first judgement of a person – all non-verbally, this fast?

2014-05-22 20.07.12 copy

(But don’t worry, we make a more lasting, detailed judgement within 30 minutes).

We started our activities with three cards each from each suit (one of the four colours) and we then met people to trade out those cards which held statements that we felt didn’t apply to us. The statements varied from things like “In a group I prefer to listen first” to “Others see me as a rebel” (that one resonated with us WMN ladies).

2014-05-22 19.22.40

 

We also did group work to come to understand the potential character attributes and style of each ‘colour’ to see if we could understand what kind of personality each colour represented. Then, we looked at ourselves and decided what order rating we would give each colour, in describing ourselves. Again, I laughed as Event Manager, Sheli, and I came out with the same – we have similar day jobs too.

The next task was to move around the room, try to talk to at least five people who would then decide what colour order I was, as I did the same for them. My first meeting was interesting, I got talking – and before I knew it, Donna came along and told us to hurry on as we needed to meet more people. What did that mean about us? I quipped.

I was interested to see that I had been rated exactly the same by the four people I met (am I one dimensional? My brother once said I was, but only because I was given three of the same Marmite cook book for my birthday one year. I’m not one dimensional. I just really, really like Marmite). More so, I was interested to see that actually, I think those appraisals were right and it was slightly different than what I had first guessed for myself.

But to be clear, we all take on different aspects in different situations, so we’re all a bit of each colour and our profiles provided by Lumina break down into the underlying persona, the every day persona and the overextended persona. Lumina also recognise that these types have negative aspects – for instance,  someone who’s tough could be too blunt for others, or aggressive. Or you could become isolated if others see you as a rebel.

2014-05-22 19.42.23

Towards the end of the session (which Lumina kindly reduced to only 1.5 hours) Rachael took us through the ‘Spark Mandala’ and asked a few to take steps forward, when the question asked applied to them. We did one set for Introverted personalities (by starting from the opposite side of the wheel, printed on the mat) and another for extroverted personalities. Again, I laughed – and announced – that the two most extroverted personalities on that group were both from WMN.

2014-05-22 20.18.06

It’s easy to see that Lumina has a rounded view of how people are and behave – and that it’s helpful both on a personal and professional level to have an understanding of your style. After all, as a ‘yellow’ person I would say that life is all about those relationships, work might mean professional relationships, some of which crossover to personal, but really, our interactions with each other, with strangers, friends, family, colleagues, loved ones and even those we don’t like so much really makes up the colour of life.

To learn more about Lumina, visit these sites:

Illuminate Training

Lumina Learning

————————————————————————————

Join the conversation:

@wmnasiapacific

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

LinkedIn group



Our next event in Hong Kong, on June 19th, is about your personal brand.

 

This one sparks my interest more than ever, because after setting up my own creative servicescompany, I not only moulded a company around my skills but I became the personal brand through which I was trying to meet clients and earn a salary. Funny how that happens, without you really planning it that way.

For our breakfast event, the objective is to empower women to make career choices that are aligned with their life goals. Making work align with my overall life goals? Wow, that also sounds great. I almost feel a burst of “I can do that?!” even though this is something I’ve been slowly (realising and) doing for the past three years.

 

Our speakers, from Linkage, Vivian Lo and Yulee Teng will share some practical tools for participants to realise and own their goals in order to lead effectively in all aspects of life.

  1. Framework of the 3 Factors of Personal and Leadership Effectiveness
  2. Understanding your values and Defining Your Goals
  3. Women’s Life Cycle and Career Choices:  Making and Owning Your Choice

“What is your personal brand?” asks Yulee Teng. “Knowing what you wish to stand for and how you demonstrate that effectively in pursuit of a happy and successful personal and professional life, is what Personal Brand Management is all about.”

Teng will take us on a guided journey of understanding our own values and needs to be effective in roles that we play in our lives and career. Acknowledging that success may take a different form and definition over the life span of a woman, we’ll explore how tomaintain authenticity while leading ourselves and those around us.

 

 

 

 

But to get you thinking about things before the event, here are some of the things I do, when I’m trying to get my work (therefore, my life) to move in the direction I really want it to.

 

Make a list. It helps you to know what you want. Always have a few things you’re asking for in your life. If you don’t how will you get it?

Think about why. Why do you want that thing? Where will it lead you? What do you need to do to get into position to enable that thing to happen?

Talk to people. Tell them what you want, let it be general knowledge. And listen to what they say. Take note of the overall response you receive, just in case you are crazy… or missing something really important in your idea.

 

Those few things at least, will get you in the right frame of mind for our session. From the point of view of a small business owner, who is basically touting herself in the name of aforementioned business, I’m really looking forward to seeing what skills I’ll learn.

See you there,

Vickie

 

If you have thoughts, questions or readings to share in advance of the event, please talk to us via our social media accounts!

@wmnasiapacific (the hashtag for this event is #wmngoals).

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

LinkedIn group

20130610_044312_23847



The event at California Vintage on April 17th, 2013 was lead by Jay Oatway.
Social Media has become very important over the past 10 years and has so much power behind it today, that it even drives certain brands and businesses. Despite being around for such a long time, not everyone knows how to use it and a few people admitted to this during the event.
Social Media doesn’t have to be complicated; it’s merely people being social in a digital space. Jay Oatway (@jayoatway) explains the different platforms available – and that it’s vital to use them in order to create an online presence for your brand. It can be confusing to figure out which is best for you, but don’t let it discourage you from at least trying some out and exploring each platform.
Twitter
Twitter has wide and diverse users who will talk about anything and everything… even their breakfast. This platform uses updates from users in the form of  a Tweets – and when posting you’re restricted to 140 characters. Don’t be discouraged by that, as Oatway explains that people use hashtags (like #wmnsocial101) to monitor conversations.
Popular hashtags trend, so sometimes you’ll see real time news before the news broadcasters have even written about it. I have found tweeting to be very beneficial to TMB, helping me to build up like-minded followers and tweet useful links that are relevant to the topics on my blog.
As social media is all about presence for brands, Oatway advises people to customise their profiles. Use a real picture of yourself as a profile picture. It can put potential followers off if your tweets and profile look like a hard brand and not a human tweeting behind that brand.
Once you’ve got the profile sorted, then what do you tweet? Social media is about sharing stories, so don’t be afraid to interact and share yours. You can search for your interests on Twitter and then interact with those who have the same interest, by asking questions or adding value to questions other people have tweeted. Oatway explains that not enough people listen, so it’s best to listen first and then add value. Another big no-no on Twitter is to shout about your products or service non stop – so be careful.
Facebook
Did you now that George Takei is one of the most influential people on Facebook? I mention this because it can be useful to look at what other people are doing and seeing how they’re interacting with people, then implement it to suit your brand. Facebook is great because you can create your own page and schedule when to post at a relevant time, by using the clock icon. This is ideal if you’re a very busy person (I use this a lot, because I don’t always have time to post things when I want).
When using Facebook for business or personal purposes, Oatway stresses that it’s important to always have a positive attitude when sharing. Keep it positive and try to ignore people who attempt to get a bad reaction from you. Heated debates can arise from controversial news or personal opinions. In those situations, other users can try to evoke negativity. Since social media is a space where people can put across their personal opinions, whether it’s on your blog or your brand page, always deal with negative comments in a positive way.
LinkedIn
LinkedIn is seen as more of a serious platform where people tend to discuss business and your profile reflects your resume. This may be the case, but Oatway says don’t be afraid to use LinkedIn for networking or creating groups with common topics as it’s not just a job hunting platform. You can still find groups based on your personal interests, but be careful if the group if of a slightly controversial topic because if you’re connected to work colleagues, they can see your groups on your profile.
If you are going to use your brand as a group, or create a group that shares interests on LinkedIn, then you need to continuously post and invite others, or it won’t thrive or grow.
Oatway compares social media to gardening where profiles and groups will only grow if they’re maintained daily with posts and responses to comments. This is something I can relate to, as it’s a problem that I face on a regular basis when finding interesting links to share on my platforms.A scheduling app, such as Hootsuite or Buffer will usually solve this problem, letting you line up posts and connect all your platforms to the app. Not only that, but there’s prime posting times and Oatway mentions this briefly. It’s good to post during those times so more people see your content.
Google+
This is a platform that I’m still figuring out for myself, but I know it’s really important for search engine rankings (SEO) because, well, it’s Google. According to Oatway, this is an up and coming social network, so it’s good to get on there while it’s becoming increasingly used. What’s interesting about G+ is that it uses circles, instead of friends, followers or connections. You can build circles according to who they are and what they do, so you can have circles with successful women, circles with friends, circles with family… the list goes on. You can also share these circles, so it’s good for businesses.
Google+ is similar to Facebook in that you can create pages for your brand. It’s very visual with a large section for cover photos, but what differentiates G+ from Facebook is that you can create communities on G+. Communities are similar to groups in LinkedIn, so you can have a space where other users can have their input. It’s important to provide a space for users to do this as Oatway emphasises that listening in social media is vital in helping you know what followers and customers like and don’t like. When you know your audience, you can make changes to better your website, business or platform.
Quick Tips
  • Be consistent with all your profiles – ensure they all have the same logo
  • Listen more than you talk – learn from people’s advice or opinions
  • Share positivity – ignore the negativity and rise above the trolls
  • Grow the communities you want – find interests and like-minded users
Towards the end of the event, Oatway offers advice on digital marketing strategies and advises to use advertising and sponsored stories within Facebook. As it’s a very popular platform, users Like a lot of pages. You will have to compete with others in regard to how you show up on a user’s news feed (Edgeranking) and paid advertising helps you stay in people’s feeds for longer. He said it’s also good to gain more Facebook Likes on your page, so you have more people to advertise to.
If you’re completely new to social media, then it’s probably a good idea to choose 1 or 2 platforms and then slowly build them up. Follow other influential users and people/ groups who post content you’re interested in, then wait for the right moment to add value to discussions. If you’re looking to create multiple accounts on different platforms for your brand, then it’s a good idea to look into an app to assist with posting, such as Tweetdeck or Hootsuite.
At the end of the day, everyone has an opinion on social media and which platforms they prefer. Everyone uses it differently too. I actually don’t know much about LinkedIn and Google+ as they’re not my preferred platforms but since the event I have considered using them more. Social media is always growing and networking sites are always evolving, adding new features and changing layouts. It comes with many advantages, including feedback for your brand, so join in the conversation, share your stories and create a buzz.
20130419_144847_15003
20130419_144848_18206


Next Wednesday (April 17th) is our next event, and one that I requested. That’s right my friends in media, a social media 101.

Why? Well since I started at WMN as the community manager, I found that while we have a lot of points to cover in our events, we have much less chatter online. But aren’t we all working in media? Don’t we know how to use these modern modes of communication? Aren’t we all tech savvy?

I’m hoping, in part, to find out the answer to that during the session. While it’s easy to think that those in the media industry might be on top of such modern phenomena, there’s no reason to assume so. In fact, often those higher up in their departments are often behind on these things, because they simply don’t have time to find out how, or, forget their password from the one hour during which, with gusto, they had decided to learn something new.

Jay Oatway will lead us in our session, in which I have asked him to literally teach us how to post and how to tweet. That shouldn’t take long, so we hope for an interactive session with some useful dos and donts as well as general brand advice for those also representing a brand online, as well as themselves.

I did notice that during our last session we saw a few more tweeters online. Perhaps it was because we were at Bloomberg – and afforded the luxury of two screens showing our event hashtag and the flow of Twitter conversations going on. I definitely picked up a few followers from the event then as well. So I hope that after this, we’ll have even more of our WMN members online, chatting and tweeting away with us.

Please join us for our debate and share your ideas and thoughts with us before hand, on our social media platforms (#wmnsocial101)

@wmnasiapacific

www.facebook.com/WMNAPAC

LinkedIn group

 

To sign up for the event, click here.

 

 


 

JayOatway, JayOatway.com

Jay has more than 100,000 social media followers worldwide and has been dubbed “Hong Kong’s answer to Twitter royalty” by Marketing magazine. He is also a co-founder of the popular MeetUp group #HKSocial andSocial Media Week Hong Kong.

Bring: your social tool of choice and your questions.

20130411_053030_28378

 

20130411_053030_30480



On Thursday 21st June 2012, over 70 business and professional women attended a breakfast seminar hosted by Women Media Networks (WMN) Singapore. The session looked at how women in Asia are using connected resources in their daily personal and professional lives, the challenges and contrasts across the region, the impact of the digital divide, and what the most popular online activities are.

An informative, statistics-driven presentation delivered by Samantha Oh of comScore opened the seminar, which included a panel discussion covering the best online practices, recommended ways to make performance-enhancing connections, the latest ways to create a professional, credible and appropriate virtual persona, as well as the most effective ways to use the full range of social networks and resources.

The panel consisted of digital though-leaders within the APAC region, including:
Kerry Brown, The Nielsen Company
Anne Lochoff, Regional Business Director, McCann Erickson
Samantha Oh, Account Director, Asia, comScore Inc.
Gina Romero, Managing Director, The Athena Network, Singapore & Asia Pacific

Myths and Truths about Women Online
Samantha introduced us to some interesting facts (and myths) about the online behaviour and activities of men and women in different regions of the world. Some surprising results came from comScore’s extensive research project:

There are more men than women online
Truth: 47%of the global web population are women

Women are more engaged on the web
Myth: On average, females spend 5% less time online than males

Men and women are equally engaged in social networking
Myth: Women are more social online, spending a greater share of their time on Social Networking, Email, and IM than men.

Men make more purchases online than women
Myth: Average time spent shopping online is markedly higher for all women, particularly those over 55

Women are driving online video
Myth: Women consistently lag men in online video viewing

Other fascinating facts about the online activity of men and women:
Puerto Rico, Hong Kong, Russia, Brazil and the US have the highest proportion of female web users above 15 years old.
Female web users in North America spend the most time online (37.9 hours) while women in Asia Pacific shows the opposite trend (17.1 hours).
In Singapore, women are spending the most time online in the following areas: Retail, Education, Email, Blogs and Travel.
Younger users have a much stronger affinity for Instant Messaging (IM), with reach declining rapidly as they get older. Women in older age groups, however, are more likely to use IM than men in the same age group.
Males in the youngest and oldest age groups are spending more time on Social Networking sites than women.
Women in Singapore are more likely to visit Twitter.com than men: 21% of women visited in April 2012, compared to only 19% of men.
Women (particularly ages 15-34) are more active bloggers than men.

About the author:

Claire Kidd is the Operations Director and Content Editor for The Athena Network, Singapore & Asia Pacific, a leading community for female executives and entrepreneurs. Claire also runs her own content strategy and editing consultancy, working with organisations and entrepreneurs to convey a professional and consistent brand message through their written content, and managing editing and sub-editing projects for major magazines and publications.

20120926_055507_24799

20120810_064149_21005